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Record for Artemis-Team Endeavour

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The Crew of Artemis-Team Endeavour celebrating the record at the end of the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race - photo RORC/Patrick Eden

Day Seven: AM Update

Artemis-Team Endeavour, skippered by Brian Thompson, crossed the finish line of the 2014 Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race off the Royal Yacht Squadron, Cowes at 23.00.54 BST on Saturday 16th August 2014 with an elapsed time of 5 days, 14 hours, 00 minutes and 54 seconds, setting a new World Record for Monohulls 60 feet and less (subject to ratification by the WSSRC).

Artemis-Team Endeavour had enjoyed an epic battle with Andrew Budgen and Fred Schwyn's Volvo 70, Monster Project for IRC Line Honours and the Canting Keel Class. Artemis-Team Endeavour crossed the line just over an hour and 20 minutes ahead of Monster Project to win the class on corrected time and set the benchmark for the IRC fleet to try and better.

"It feels good to break the record," smiled Brian Thompson, just after the finish. "We had a great crew, great boat and good competition the whole way round. I have broken records before, but it is often solo and not in a race, so it was great to have so many boats on the start line and to sail with a fantastic bunch of people. Monster Project gave us a great battle the whole way around the course and so it was more than just about breaking a record; it was a tremendous race.

"The stand out leg for us was after St.Kilda. We put the spinnaker up for the first time and we were sailing hot angles, surfing down waves. We had lots of good drivers on board so we kept the boat flying along all the time. That was the key; keep changing drivers, keep trimming and we kept rumbling along. We had come from the cold wet North Sea into fantastic weather with blue sky speeding along downwind and we were loving it."

At 0930, Jens Kellinghusen's German Ker 51, Varuna was just off St. Catherine's Point 30 miles from the finish and is expected to take the overall lead under IRC for the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race. A full report will follow this afternoon.

Last night the fleet of seven yachts still racing north of the Scottish mainland experienced big seas and occasional gale force winds. Jankees Lampe's Open 40, La Promesse has made it safely to Stornaway having suspended racing for sail repairs. The brutal weather conditions are expected to ease once the fleet pass Blackrock to the north west of Ireland. At 0930 BST, Katrin Hilbert's Hapsa Hamburg was past Blackrock. Carol Smolawa's Bank von Bremen and Roderick Knowles' Swish were approaching Blackrock and heading towards easier conditions.

At 0930 BST, Roderick Knowles' Class40 Swish was 580 miles from the finish on the west coast of Ireland approaching Blackrock. The British Class 40 is currently well inside the world record for yachts of 40 feet or less.

Ian Hoddle, racing Two Handed with Conrad Manning in his Figaro II, Rare, contacted the RORC Media team this morning at 0900 BST as the duo were just north of the Isle of Lewis:

"It's been a wild night with big seas, but we managed to overtake two boats since yesterday because we were literally flying!" commented Conrad Manning. "We don't know what the wind speed was last night as our windex broke off two days ago, but I would estimate 50+ was the highest gust. Currently looking for the food bag. When I find it, it will be Mexican Tuna Pasta for lunch then most likely curry for dinner. Ian is at the helm taming us to safety. Everything is soaked through except for one dry jumper and half a sleeping bag. I am typing this with one boot off trying to dry the inside of it. Both of us are doing well and tiredness has not set in yet."Ian Hoddle's Rare at the start of the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race - photo RORC/Rick Tomlinson

Ifan James, skipper of Stimson 42, Palpatine phoned in last night. "We have experienced 45 knots of wind and 10 metre waves. The sea state in particular is taking its toll on the crew. Now we have the advantage of daylight we are going to head for some shelter (probably inside the Hebrides), but at this point, we are still in the race."

Liam Coyne and Brian Flahive racing the First 36.7, Lula Belle Two-Handed will have had a rough night too, but this morning the Irish duo are heading towards Ireland and now have less than 1,000 miles to the finish. Werner Landwehr's Figaro II, Dessert D'Alcyone, also at the top of the course, rounded Out Stack yesterday, at approximately 1200 BST.